External Applications in Anthroposophic Nursing

Horseradish

Synonyms
Cochlearia armoracia
Composition
Root, freshly grated

Guiding principle

Horseradish grows wild, but also as a cultivated plant, on rather damp soil that is easily penetrated by roots. It forms a slightly woody, light yellow root, the juice of which is rich in pungent, essential oils. The long, flame-like leaves testify to pronounced vegetative power that draws the plant into the root, where it forms mustard glycosides, among other things. The pungency of the mustard oil causes strong irritation on skin and mucous membranes. Applied locally, it warms deeply. Internally, horseradish stimulates the appetite and kills pathogenic germs in the digestive tract.

Indications and application

Headache

Migraine

Migraines

Pansinusitis

Sinusitis